March Community Newsletter Competition - Closed

  • 26 February 2020
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March Community Newsletter Competition - Closed
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If you went to school in the UK or Ireland, you’ll probably remember celebrating World Book Day every year. This charity event is all about the joy of reading and gives millions of schoolchildren free vouchers to spend on books and audiobooks.

 

To mark this year’s World Book Day, on Thursday 5 March, we’ve put together a list of our favourite audiobook websites. Why not celebrate World Book Day by diving in and finding something you haven’t read before?

 

And to celebrate World Book Day the iD way, we’re running a competition for all you bookworms out there. Comment below and tell us about a book you love, and you could win an Amazon Kindle e-reader! Find out more below.

 

Top audiobook websites

Audible

Audible, owned by Amazon, is the world’s biggest audiobook provider, with hundreds of thousands of titles available to download. The subscription fee gives you one credit a month, which you can use to buy any audiobook, regardless of the price. If you don’t like a book, you can exchange it for free, and you can also cancel your subscription at any time.

Download the Audible app here.

 

Rakuten Kobo

KoboeReaders are one of the main rivals to Amazon Kindle, but did you know that Kobo (owned by Rakuten) also specialise in audiobooks? They offer a free 30-day trial, followed by a subscription package. As with Audible, the fee gives you one credit a month, which you can use to buy any audiobook.

Listen to Rakuten Kobo audiobooks on Android and iOS.

 

Downpour

Like Audible and Rakuten Kobo, Downpour is a subscription site where you use credits to buy an audiobook every month. All of its titles are DRM-free (which means they have no digital lock), so you can listen to them on as many of your devices as you like. Downpour also offers a rental service, which is cheaper than a monthly subscription. You can borrow audiobooks for up to two months, and pay to extend the loan if you need to.

Check out Downpour on Android and iOS.

 

Google Play Books

Google Play Books sellsaudiobooks individually, so it’s ideal if you don’t want to commit to a monthly subscription. You can buy several titles in one go, and listen to a free sample before you buy. If you’re listening on a Google Home device, you can use voice commands to control the playback – great when you don’t have a hand free to press buttons. Another nice feature is the Google Play Family Library, which lets you share audiobooks with up to 5 other people.

Listen to Google Play Books on Android or iOS.

 

LibriVox

If you don’t want to pay for audiobooks, then why not try LibriVox? It has a huge selection of titles – more than 13,000 at the last count – and they’re all available for free. The books recorded have to be in the public domain, so you won’t find the latest bestsellers here. And the readers are all volunteers, so the audio quality can be uneven. But if you love classic literature and don’t mind the odd bit of background noise, then LibriVox could be the best site for you.

Check out LibriVox here.

 

Win an Amazon Kindle!

To celebrate World Book Day, we’re giving away two Amazon Kindle e-readers. To enter the competition, all you need to do is comment below this post and answer this question:

 

What is your favourite childhood book, and why?

 

The two lucky winners will each receive an Amazon Kindle 6" e-reader (2019) - 4 GB, White.

Don’t miss out! The competition ends on 8th March 2020 so get commenting. T&Cs apply

Good luck!


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70 replies

Userlevel 1

Swallow and Amazons. - Childhood memories/fantasies.

Userlevel 2

When I was younger I liked books about crime because I thought they were really interesting. I especially liked the CSI books as I used to pretend I was in the book and it brought everything to life for me, it was so great as a kid to be able to do that.

Userlevel 1

"The lion the witch and the wardrobe,"because it was the first book to scare me as a child, the final scene with aslan the lion stayed with me for the rest of my life. 

Userlevel 1

I loved the Secret Seven books. Not sure how many there are, but I read loads of them. Helped my reading develop & gave me a life long love of books.

Userlevel 1

My favourite childhood book was The Twits by Roald Dahl.  It was the first book that truly made me laugh out loud and ignited my passion for reading at an early age.  It was not only hilariously funny but also really fun to read - half the battle for a young reluctant reader!  I’m so thankful for Roald Dahl writing such extraordinary books. 

Userlevel 1

Absolutely love reading and re-reading Lord of the Rings, especially the appendices which give more detail about the whole world, how it came about and the history of why the hostilities exist during the setting of LOTR.  Complementary readings are The Hobbit and the Silmarillion.  I started on these aged around 10 years old and still find new things today. Thanks

I used to collect Peanuts (AKA Snoopy)  books when I was little. I loved the artwork, the humour which was often, I think, aimed at adults, and Snoopy himself. I used to collect them from second hand shops and I still have a few that are special :)

Userlevel 1

Richard Scarry's ‘Cars and Trucks and Things That Go’. There is so much detail and humour on every page and I always wanted a pickle truck. Brilliant. I’ve kept the hard back copies because they still make me smile.

My favourite book was tell the time with pooh! It had a clock you could turn to go with each page

Userlevel 1

A favorite of mine is ‘The Last Battle’, the epic conclusion to the Narnia series and a very deep and meaningful book!

It has to be c.s Lewis ‘The lion the witch and the wardrobe’

Such a magical book!

I read my copy until it completely fell apart, I’ve  had to wrap it in a plastic cover.

It still captures the imagination of children as my daughter has now fallen in love with the story too.

Userlevel 1

The Hobbit - It's an epic fantasy story

If you went to school in the UK or Ireland, you’ll probably remember celebrating World Book Day every year. This charity event is all about the joy of reading and gives millions of schoolchildren free vouchers to spend on books and audiobooks.

 

To mark this year’s World Book Day, on Thursday 5 March, we’ve put together a list of our favourite audiobook websites. Why not celebrate World Book Day by diving in and finding something you haven’t read before?

 

And to celebrate World Book Day the iD way, we’re running a competition for all you bookworms out there. Comment below and tell us about a book you love, and you could win an Amazon Kindle e-reader! Find out more below.

 

Top audiobook websites

Audible

Audible, owned by Amazon, is the world’s biggest audiobook provider, with hundreds of thousands of titles available to download. The subscription fee gives you one credit a month, which you can use to buy any audiobook, regardless of the price. If you don’t like a book, you can exchange it for free, and you can also cancel your subscription at any time.

Download the Audible app here.

 

Rakuten Kobo

KoboeReaders are one of the main rivals to Amazon Kindle, but did you know that Kobo (owned by Rakuten) also specialise in audiobooks? They offer a free 30-day trial, followed by a subscription package. As with Audible, the fee gives you one credit a month, which you can use to buy any audiobook.

Listen to Rakuten Kobo audiobooks on Android and iOS.

 

Downpour

Like Audible and Rakuten Kobo, Downpour is a subscription site where you use credits to buy an audiobook every month. All of its titles are DRM-free (which means they have no digital lock), so you can listen to them on as many of your devices as you like. Downpour also offers a rental service, which is cheaper than a monthly subscription. You can borrow audiobooks for up to two months, and pay to extend the loan if you need to.

Check out Downpour on Android and iOS.

 

Google Play Books

Google Play Books sellsaudiobooks individually, so it’s ideal if you don’t want to commit to a monthly subscription. You can buy several titles in one go, and listen to a free sample before you buy. If you’re listening on a Google Home device, you can use voice commands to control the playback – great when you don’t have a hand free to press buttons. Another nice feature is the Google Play Family Library, which lets you share audiobooks with up to 5 other people.

Listen to Google Play Books on Android or iOS.

 

LibriVox

If you don’t want to pay for audiobooks, then why not try LibriVox? It has a huge selection of titles – more than 13,000 at the last count – and they’re all available for free. The books recorded have to be in the public domain, so you won’t find the latest bestsellers here. And the readers are all volunteers, so the audio quality can be uneven. But if you love classic literature and don’t mind the odd bit of background noise, then LibriVox could be the best site for you.

Check out LibriVox here.

 

Win an Amazon Kindle!

To celebrate World Book Day, we’re giving away two Amazon Kindle e-readers. To enter the competition, all you need to do is comment below this post and answer this question:

 

What is your favourite childhood book, and why?

 

The two lucky winners will each receive an Amazon Kindle 6" e-reader (2019) - 4 GB, White.

Don’t miss out! The competition ends on 8th March 2020 so get commenting. T&Cs apply

Good luck!

Road Dahl charlie and the chocolate factory, no one has written quite like him since!

My favourite book when I was at school was Ring of Bright Water by Gavin Maxwell . This was a very moving true story of the author's life in Scotland caring for otters. The story is sometimes funny, sometimes sad and even tragic. I remember, some years after leaving school, there was a nature program on tv with Terry Nutkins as a presenter and he had worked with Gavin Maxwell. The story tells of Terry having a finger bitten off by an otter and I noticed Terry had indeed lost a finger. This book started my love of otters. 

Userlevel 1

My favourite book was the Faraway Tree.  I adored all Enid Blyton books.  I was given it as a prize at Sunday School. I used to wish I could visit the land at the top and felt like Moonface and Silky were my best friends :-)

Anything by Enid Blyton  but especially the Magic Faraway Tree.  Really enjoyed reading this series, found it exciting and fascinating. Could really lose myself in these 

Well it will have to be Spacedog and Roy, I loved that book and I’ve just this minute purchased a copy of the book for my 4 year old daughter so I can read it to her. Then it’ll have to be Z for Zachariah 

My favourite book used to be Alice in Wonderland as it featured beautiful world of magic. I remember reading it in bed and imagining being Alice and playing her adventures.

Any of the RL Stine Goosebumps books, which were really popular when I read as a kid.

 

But my personal favourite is One Day at Horrorland. I like how Stine always played with your expectations and made books scary enough to actually be scary, but not mortifying for kids. That said, it put me off theme parks for years!

Userlevel 1

Showing my age, it would have to be any of the Famous Five books by Enid Blyton. I always found them so engaging. They managed to conjure up so many emotions. Brilliant.

The Magic Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton  This was my favourite many years ago and it still delights my grandchildren today  A mixture of fantasy, adventure and excitement leading to dreams of faraway lands.

My favourite childhood books were the Harry Potter series. I loved the tales of friendship, the exciting adventures and of course all the magic and the notion that anything is possible. 

I don’t recall what I read in my early childhood but the one book that still sticks in my memory is THE HISTORY OF MR POLLY by H.G. WELLS which we read in Secondary School.   We studied it for our G.C.E exams so really took it apart!!  I have read it a few times since and it never fails to entertain me.  At home I read what my father read mainly, including Agatha Christie, Ngaio Marsh and other detective novelists.  My father was also instrumental in introducing me to Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited.  

Swallow and Amazons. - Childhood memories/fantasies.

Also one of my favourites, so different from my city existence then.

Oh my dayyysss I loved, like properly LOVED, "The Hunger Games". I watched the film, then read the book, then wanted to watch the film again but couldn't, so I read the book another time. I think I read it about three times! I loved the drama and adventure and the themes kf sacrifice, love and justice. Ah just thinking about it makes me want to read it again haha!